Monday, February 16, 2015

Sunday, February 15, 2015

introduction to sociology (honors) review sheet for exam 1 February 20

Introduction to Sociology (Honors)
Review Sheet for Exam 1
Friday February 20, 2015

Exam 1 will cover Chapters 1 and 2 in the textbook and the associated lectures.

You should be able to define and discuss the importance of the following ideas and people.

sociology, psychology, biology, chemistry, physics
theology and philosophy
empiricism
social explanation
theory

urbanization
capitalism
applied science and technology

social conflict
inequality
alienation
morale
colonialism
public health

Auguste Comte
Karl Marx
Max Weber
Emile Durkheim
Georg Simmel

Reconstruction Era
immigration

social problems
progressive movement
quantitative analysis

research questions
theories
hypotheses
research designs

surveys
ethnography
experiments
comparative/historical analysis

William Ogburn
Robert Park

sociological functionalism
conflict theory
cultural theory
gender theory

postmodernism

sociology of culture review sheet for exam 1 Friday February 20

Sociology of Culture
Review Sheet for Exam 1
Friday February 20, 2015

The first exam will count for 25% of your final grade, and will cover the following readings:

William Sewell jr., The Concept(s) of Culture
Critical Theory, from Standord Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno, The Culture Industry
Max Weber, “The Social Psychology of the World Religions”
Bryan Turner, Islam, Capitalism and the Weber Theses
Samuel Huntington, Cultures Count
Richard Shweder, "On the Return of the 'Civilizing' Project"

You should be able to define and discuss the following people and ideas:

Karl Marx
George Lukacs
Antonio Gramsci
Horkheimer and Adorno
Max Weber
Bryan Turner

“Prison Notebooks”
The Dialectic of Enlightenment”
“The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism”

“cultural turn”
Newtonian paradigm
Positivism
Hypothesis testing
Cause-and-effect relationships
“linguistic turn”
“cognitive revolution”

Sociology of culture
Cultural sociology

Culture as “cultivation”
civilization and barbarism
folk culture
culture as learned behavior
culture as learned behavior associated with social meaning
culture as systems of symbols and meanings
culture as a life-system, way of life

historical materialism
Communist revolution
false consciousness
“Opium of the people”
other-wordliness

Commodification
Commodity Fetishism
Class consciousness
Hegemony
“Organic intellectuals”
Culture industry
“lowest common denominator”

Value-rationality
Purposive rationality
Salvation
Theodicy
Calvinism
Bryan Turner
Islamic asceticism
Sufi mystics
“Sultanism”

Individualism
Equality
Trust
Social capital
Optimism/pessimism
Civility
Time orientation

cultural anthropology
synchronic analysis
diachronic analysis
culture-and-personality
“personality writ large”
“modal personality”
“man is an animal suspended in webs of significance”
ethnography
“thick description”

“the return of the ‘civilizing’ project”

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Introduction to Sociological Theory
Prof. Gabe Ignatow
Review Sheet for Exam 1
Wednesday February 18 in class

The 1st exam will cover the course readings on the syllabus through 3a. Durkheim and mechanical and organic solidarity II-6.

You should be able to define and discuss all of the following terms. Note that this list is a guide only, and everything from the lectures and readings for this section of the course can be included on the exam.

Readings:
  • C. W. Mills VIII-37
  • Weber on Verstehen III-11
  • Durkheim’s Suicide II-8
  • Marx on false consciousness I-2
  • Simmel on urban life IV-16, 17
  • Durkheim and mechanical and organic solidarity II-6

What is sociological theory?
What is a theory?
C. Wright Mills
“Culture and Politics”
“false consciousness”
Suicide and social integration

Karl Marx
“The German Ideology”
Max Weber
“‘Objectivity in Social Science and Social Policy’”
Emile Durkheim

“Anomic Suicide”
Charles Darwin
Auguste Comte
Thomas Malthus
Herbert Spencer
Ferdinand Toennies
Georg Simmel
“Fashion” and “The Problem of Sociology”
Network analysis

Functionalism
Conflict theory
Inequality
Cultural Theory
Values
Rituals
Socialization

Organic analogy
Theological stage
Metaphysical stage
Positivist stage
Natural selection
“survival of the fittest”
“Laws of Population Growth”
Meritocracy
Gemeinschaft (“Community”)
Gesellschaft (“Society”)

Mechanical solidarity
Organic solidarity
Anomie
Individualization
“The Metropolis and Mental Life”
Network analysis


Friday, February 6, 2015

Haiti: Culture Matters?

Lawrence Harrison

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TiELJTIQT8Q

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Introduction to Sociology (Honors)

SOCI 1500-003 Introduction to Sociology (Honors)

MWF 9-9:50am
Lang 402
January 20-May 15

Associate Professor Gabe Ignatow 
ignatow@unt.edu 
Chilton 390E 
940 565 3616

Assigned book

Introduction to Sociology (Seagull Ninth Edition) Paperback – 2013
by Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum, and Deborah Carr
ISBN-13: 978-0393922233 ISBN-10: 0393922235

Assignments

Assignments are based on both the assigned readings from the textbook and the lectures, which only partially track the textbook.

4 pop quizzes administered in class, 5% each
2 exams, 25% each
1 final exam, 30%

Syllabus

1. Introduction

Read Chapter 1: What is Sociology? (week 1 Jan 21-23)

2. What Is Sociological Research?

Read Chapter 2 Asking and Answering Sociological Questions (week 2 Jan 26-30)

quiz 1

3. Culture and Society

Read Chapter 3: Culture and Society (week 3 Feb 2-6)

quiz 2

4. Groups, Networks, and Organizations

Read Chapter 6: Groups, Networks and Organizations (week 4 Feb 9-13)

exam 1 (week 5 Feb. 20 in class)

5. Social Inequality

Read Chapter 8: Stratification, Class and Inequality (week 6 Feb 23-27)

Read Chapter 9: Global Inequality (week 7 March 2-6)

quiz 3

Read Chapter 10: Gender Inequality (week 8 March 9-13)

spring break

Read Chapter 11: Ethnicity and Race (week 9 March 23-27)

exam 2 (March 27)

6. Work and Economic Life

Read Chapter 14. Work and Economic Life (week 10 March 30-April 3)

7. Sociology of Education

Read Chapter 16: Education  (week 11 April 6-10)

quiz 4

8. Sociology of Religion

Read Chapter 17: Religion  (week 12 April 13-17)

9. Sociology of Globalization

Read Chapter 20: Globalization and a Changing World  (week 13 April 20-24)

Week 14 April 27-May 1 flex week and final exam review

final exam (not cumulative)

Sunday, June 22, 2014

SOCI 5260/6500: Text Analysis

Summer II 2014

M,T,W,Th, 12-1:50pm, Wooten Hal 116, July 7-August 8, 2014

Professor Gabe Ignatow
gignatow@gmail.com

Although this course has a room assigned, it is online-only. We will communicate by email, supplemented by several in-person meetings.

Course description: Social media sites generate massive volumes of natural language data that are available for social science research, and social scientists have developed a number of new technologies for analyzing this data. Researchers are scaling up traditional research techniques to take advantage of new sources of textual data, as well as developing new methods along with new theoretical and metatheoretical frameworks and approaches to research ethics. This course provides a practical guide to contemporary text mining and analysis for the social sciences, covering both qualitative and quantitative text analytic research methods. Our focus in this course is mainly on sociological text analysis methods, including computer-assisted qualitative methods, semantic text analysis methods, and topic models.

Requirements:
1) Completion of weekly assignments (see below)
2) Completion of 10-page final paper

Final paper requirements: 

The final paper can be a proposal for a text mining and analysis project, a completed text mining and analysis project, or somewhere in between. For all final papers, students must collect their own data and explain and justify their sampling strategy. For CAQDAS projects, students must develop a coding scheme and apply it to a sub-sample of the larger text sample. For projects using more highly automated methods, students must review relevant text analysis methods and propose a strategy that can yield results relevant to the research question.

10 pages inclusive of full references, 12-pt font, double-spaced


WEEK 1: INTRODUCTION AND TEXT MINING




Assignments: send by email to gignatow@gmail.com by 12pm Friday July 11
1) Propose one or more research questions that could be approached with text analysis methods
2) Identify 3 or more possible data sources, including newspaper archives, historical archives, social media platforms, websites, or research databases.

(15 points)

WEEK 2: TEXT MINING AND CAQDAS

1. Text Mining


Text mining packages (free) (check YouTube for tutorials)


2. CAQDAS




Free trials of CAQDAS packages (check YouTube for tutorials)


Assignments: send by email to gignatow@gmail.com by 12pm Friday July 18
1) Scrape or otherwise create a text sample of at least 5000 words. Describe the sample and how you collected it.
2) Write a 1-2-page memo describing possible coding schemes you will use on your data.

(15 points)

WEEK 3: SEQUENCE ANALYSIS METHODS
Franzosi 1987 From Words to Numbers
Franzosi 1998 Narrative Analysis

Assignments: send by email to gignatow@gmail.com by 12pm Friday July25
1) Write 1-2-page reviews of two of this week's articles
2) Write a 1-page update of your progress on your final paper

(10 points)

WEEK 4: SEMANTIC AND SENTIMENT ANALYSIS

Bail 2012 The Fringe Effect

Assignments: send by email to gignatow@gmail.com by 12pm Friday Aug 1
1) Write 1-2-page reviews of two of this week's articles
2) Write a 1-page update of your progress on your final paper

(10 points)

WEEK 5: TOPIC MODELS

August 4 Mohr and Bogdanov 2013 Topic Models--What They Are and Why They Matter
August 5-6 Mohr, Wagner-Pacifici, Breiger and Bogdanov Graphing the Grammar of Motives in National Security Strategy

Assignments:
Email presentations to gignatow@gmail.com and ignatow@unt.edu by 5pm August 7 (10 points)
Final paper due by email by 12pm Friday August 8 (40 points)